Category Archives: Labour Market

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Labour Market – Feb Quarter 2015

Category:Labour Market,Labour Market 2015

Job losses in Northern NSW to impact State Poll

According to the latest ABS labour market statistics more than 55,000 jobs have been lost in five NSW regions during the past 12 months.

Comparing the Feb quarter 2014 with the Feb quarter 2015, these five regions – Richmond Tweed, Central West, Hunter Valley, Central Coast and Baulkham Hills/Hawkesbury – are the worst performing Labour markets in both NSW and Australia.

The five regions contain some 19 State seats whose MPs will be determined in the NSW elections on March 28.

Up to eight of these seats could change hands on March 28 and the worst performing region of Richmond Tweed contains marginal seats of Ballina, Tweed and Lismore, which are also impacted by the coal seam gas issue and strong local Green campaigns.

The labour market in Richmond Tweed looks somewhat similar to the Wide Bay region in Queensland, which provided two surprise provincial city gains for the ALP in the recent January 31 Queensland poll.

The excel file below provides basic labour market quarterly summaries for all Australian labour market regions – along with our region codes – and it can thus be easily resorted to for research purposes.

Click Here for BASIC LABOUR MARKET QUARTERLY SUMMARY

 

 

 

 


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MAY QTR 2014 – LABOUR FORCE PARTICIPATION RATE MAP

Category:Labour Market 2014,Maps - Labour Market,Maps By Postcodes

 

To locate a postcode, type your postcode into the search window and hit enter. Click on the search result and the map will centre on your postcode. The search window can be accessed by clicking OPTIONS in the top left-hand corner of the map.

 

Map provided by Business Geographics Pty Ltd

 

Disclaimer: The Labour Market reports and associated maps have been prepared as an educational and public relations exercise and have not been designed as an advisory tool for business and we take no responsibility for those who use either of them for these purposes. The sampling errors for smaller Labour Force regions are often large and the raw figures used cannot be easily adjusted for seasonal trends. The statistical significance of the profiles also need to be considered. We repeat, caution is urged in any interpretation of these statistics. We acknowledge and thank the Australian Bureau of Statistics for the provision of original data, Dr Otto Helwig of MDS for the HES micro simulation modelling and Phil Henry of Business Geographics for the mapping.

 

 


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MAY QTR 2014 – AUSTRALIAN JOB PROFILE

Category:Labour Market,Labour Market 2014

Originally published in “The Australian”

 

During the 12 months to May 2014, YoY employment growth was 99,400, unemployment growth was 43,000 and Not in the Labour Force growth was 197,500. Given our long term participation and unemployment rates of about 65 percent and 5 percent respectively, we should have seen employment growth of 210,000, unemployment growth of 10,000 and Not in the Labour Force growth of 120,000. So our employment growth was about 110,000 too low, employment growth was 30,000 too high and Not in the Labour Force was 80,000 too high.

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FEB 13 to FEB 14 -CHANGE IN UNEMPLOYMENT RATE

Category:Labour Market,Labour Market 2014,Maps - Labour Market,Maps By Postcodes

 

To locate a postcode, type your postcode into the search window and hit enter. Click on the search result and the map will centre on your postcode. The search window can be accessed by clicking OPTIONS in the top left-hand corner of the map.

 

Map provided by Business Geographics Pty Ltd

Disclaimer: The Labour Market reports and associated maps have been prepared as an educational and public relations exercise and have not been designed as an advisory tool for business and we take no responsibility for those who use either of them for these purposes. The sampling errors for smaller Labour Force regions are often large and the raw figures used cannot be easily adjusted for seasonal trends. The statistical significance of the profiles also need to be considered. We repeat, caution is urged in any interpretation of these statistics. We acknowledge and thank the Australian Bureau of Statistics for the provision of original data, Dr Otto Helwig of MDS for the HES micro simulation modelling and Phil Henry of Business Geographics for the mapping.

 

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FEB 2014 – AUSTRALIAN JOB PROFILE

Category:Labour Market,Labour Market 2014 Tags : 

 

The reader is advised that Labour Market data provided by the Australian Bureau of Statistics has undergone a major overhaul leading up to the preparation of the February Quarter figures.

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AUG 2013 – AUSTRALIAN JOB PROFILE

Category:Labour Market,Labour Market 2013

This profile is based on jobs data collected by the Australian Bureau of Statistics. The primary source is the monthly Labour Force survey by Regions (6291.0.55.001), but includes national data from 6202.0, detailed quarterly data from 6291.0.55.003, earnings by industry 6302.0 Job Vacancies Australia 6354.0 and Demographic Statistics 3101.0. We have also made some use of ABS data on underemployment and labour underutilisation. As detailed data is only available in Original form, we use this, unless otherwise stated to be Trend or Seasonally Adjusted.

The modelling used by ADS compares this cross section of data with our elaborate database and uses inferential statistics to project these sample results onto all Australian postcodes and Commonwealth Electoral Divisions. Material in the ADS elaborate database is based on data from the ABS Census, Electoral Commissions, Household Expenditure Surveys modelled by MDS Data Systems, data on home loan arrears and a wide range of published data on political and economic behaviour.

 

Read FULL REPORT – Australian Job Profile – August 2013

Disclaimer: The Labour Market reports and associated maps have been prepared as an educational and public relations exercise and have not been designed as an advisory tool for business and we take no responsibility for those who use either of them for these purposes. The sampling errors for smaller Labour Force regions are often large and the raw figures used cannot be easily adjusted for seasonal trends. The statistical significance of the profiles also need to be considered. We repeat, caution is urged in any interpretation of these statistics. We acknowledge and thank the Australian Bureau of Statistics for the provision of original data, Dr Otto Helwig of MDS for the HES micro simulation modelling and Phil Henry of Business Geographics for the mapping.

 

 


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NOV 2012 – AUSTRALIAN JOB PROFILE

Category:Labour Market,Labour Market 2012

This profile is based on jobs data collected by the Australian Bureau of Statistics. The primary source is the monthly Labour Force survey by Regions (6291.0.55.001), but includes national data from 6202.0, detailed quarterly data from 6291.0.55.003, earnings by industry 6302.0 Job Vacancies Australia 6354.0 and Demographic Statistics 3101.0.

The modelling used by ADS compares this cross section of data with our elaborate database and uses inferential statistics to project these sample results onto all Australian postcodes, 2006 Census Collectors’ Districts and Commonwealth Electoral Divisions. Material in the ADS elaborate database is based on data from the ABS Census, Electoral Commissions, Household Expenditure Surveys modelled by MDS Data Systems,

Fitch Ratings data on home loan arrears and a wide range of published data on political and economic behaviour.

Read Full Report – Australian Job Profile – Nov 2012

Disclaimer: The Labour Market reports and associated maps have been prepared as an educational and public relations exercise and have not been designed as an advisory tool for business and we take no responsibility for those who use either of them for these purposes. The sampling errors for smaller Labour Force regions are often large and the raw figures used cannot be easily adjusted for seasonal trends. The statistical significance of the profiles also need to be considered. We repeat, caution is urged in any interpretation of these statistics. We acknowledge and thank the Australian Bureau of Statistics for the provision of original data, Dr Otto Helwig of MDS for the HES micro simulation modelling and Phil Henry of Business Geographics for the mapping.

 


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Demographic Winners & Losers in 2014

Category:Labour Market,Labour Market 2014

We have been saying for some time that any improvement in the labour market could be identified by a rise in employment numbers, accompanied by a rise in the unemployment rate and this time may have finally arrived. What has been needed since the GFC is a surge in private sector jobs growth, strong enough to induce some of the hidden unemployed back into the ranks of the official job seekers. It is still early days but the November quarter labour market figures look encouraging.

The past 12 months saw big job gains for Hospitality (Accommodation and Food), Professional Consulting, Construction, Arts and Recreation, Real Estate, Media, Transport and Education and these outnumbered losses in Mining, Manufacturing, Utilities, Wholesale, Public Admin and Health.

Read Full Report :   ADS Jobs Profile Nov Qtr 2014 final.pdf

 

To locate a postcode, type your postcode into the search window and hit enter. Click on the search result and the map will centre on your postcode. The search window can be accessed by clicking OPTIONS in the top left-hand corner of the map.

 

 

Map provided by Business Geographics Pty Ltd
Disclaimer: The Labour Market reports and associated maps have been prepared as an educational and public relations exercise and have not been designed as an advisory tool for business and we take no responsibility for those who use either of them for these purposes. The sampling errors for smaller Labour Force regions are often large and the raw figures used cannot be easily adjusted for seasonal trends. The statistical significance of the profiles also need to be considered. We repeat, caution is urged in any interpretation of these statistics. We acknowledge and thank the Australian Bureau of Statistics for the provision of original data, Dr Otto Helwig of MDS for the HES micro simulation modelling and Phil Henry of Business Geographics for the mapping.


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AUG 2012 – AUSTRALIAN JOB PROFILE

Category:Labour Market,Labour Market 2012

This profile is based on jobs data collected by the Australian Bureau of Statistics. The primary source is the monthly Labour Force survey by Regions (6291.0.55.001), but includes national data from 6202.0, detailed quarterly data from 6291.0.55.003, earnings by industry 6302.0 Job Vacancies Australia 6354.0 and Demographic Statistics 3101.0.

The modelling used by ADS compares this cross section of data with our elaborate database and uses inferential statistics to project these sample results onto all Australian postcodes and Commonwealth Electoral Divisions.

 

Read FULL REPORT – Australian Job Profile – August 2012 

 

Disclaimer: The Labour Market reports and associated maps have been prepared as an educational and public relations exercise and have not been designed as an advisory tool for business and we take no responsibility for those who use either of them for these purposes. The sampling errors for smaller Labour Force regions are often large and the raw figures used cannot be easily adjusted for seasonal trends. The statistical significance of the profiles also need to be considered. We repeat, caution is urged in any interpretation of these statistics. We acknowledge and thank the Australian Bureau of Statistics for the provision of original data, Dr Otto Helwig of MDS for the HES micro simulation modelling and Phil Henry of Business Geographics for the mapping.

 

 


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FEB 2012 – AUSTRALIAN JOB PROFILE

Category:Labour Market,Labour Market 2012

This is the first time we have modelled per capita employment as well as unemployment and it was felt to be a good check on who is leaving theworkforce but not identifying as unemployed. This hidden unemployment has been growing over the past year, hiding a much higher real levelof unemployment.

Some 18 of 69 Labour  Force regions had unemployment growth on or above 1.5 percent to Feb 2012, putting them on the RUIN recession risk list.

The worst 18 regions were a mix of rural and regional Australia and some richer inner city suburbs from the capital cities. Profiling confirms we were looking here at regions dominated by older persons transitioning to retirement, and the rich. The richer groups were high SES professionals, with Arts degree and Education backgrounds, paying a lot of money on private and Catholic school fees.

The regions which have been seeing reduced unemployment in the past year were large parts of WA, SA and some provincial cities along the east coast. Profiling confirms these were dominated by mining workers, especially those who commuted by FIFO or DIDO and workers in utilities. Both of these industries have had large increases in wages and employees in the past four years.

Read FULL REPORTAustralian Job Profile – February 2012

Disclaimer: The Labour Market reports and associated maps have been prepared as an educational and public relations exercise and have not been designed as an advisory tool for business and we take no responsibility for those who use either of them for these purposes. The sampling errors for smaller Labour Force regions are often large and the raw figures used cannot be easily adjusted for seasonal trends. The statistical significance of the profiles also need to be considered. We repeat, caution is urged in any interpretation of these statistics. We acknowledge and thank the Australian Bureau of Statistics for the provision of original data, Dr Otto Helwig of MDS for the HES micro simulation modelling and Phil Henry of Business Geographics for the mapping.

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